What is a Cleanroom

CLEANROOMS – those white, sterile rooms at medical and research facilities. Cleanrooms are not known for their energy efficiency as a rule. In fact, cleanrooms are notorious for the amount of energy that are required to be used to keep them clean and comfortable enough to work in. It will be interesting to see what developments in efficiency take place.
Cleanrooms also rely on high-standard air filtration systems (HEPA or ULPA) and require ample lighting. These facts make such environments the next candidates for Advanced Technical Manufacturing, R&D firms, and hospitals that are looking to add sustainability to their operations.
Our current times and perhaps changes in the economy as well have resulted in demand for more energy efficiency in cleanrooms from the pharma and biotechnology sectors. It will be interesting to see how this will develop over the next couple of years.
What are Companies are looking at for their operations?
1. Construction materials used to build the cleanroom
2. Energy used by lights, fans, heaters, air conditioners, and other electrical equipment
3. Energy usage and waste generated by disposable garments or laundered clothing
4. Ways to produce less contaminated waste-water.
A number of companies are turning to modular cleanrooms as a way to minimize costs and gain efficiencies as opposed to contracting for custom-built units. More and more cleanrooms are being built with materials, i.e., (walls and ceilings) that have improved insulation to help keep heat in or out. The goal of course is the reducing heating or cooling costs, a more affordable to operate cleanroom.
Some modular cleanrooms are designed of selected with the idea of reducing the possibility of dirt and particles becoming trapped in joints and corners. Such modular designs are making the cleanroom easier to clean, and requiring fewer cleaning solvents.
As regard to the special clothing that clean room technicians or operators have to wear there are consumables such as; disposable gloves, bouffant, beard-covers, and shoe covers as well. A number of companies are moving away form single-use and disposable garments wear possible. For example, to reduce the number of gloves required daily, they may have employees use glove liners. Of course consumable product reductions will have to be determined for each clean room operation and of course the product(s) produced in the clean room itself.
HOUSEKEEPING PROCEDURES
The housekeeping practices recommended here provide a comprehensive program for the removal and control of viable and nonviable contamination. It should be recognized that not all of these practices are necessary for all clean rooms.
Clean rooms in which viable contamination is of primary concern will require a different sequence of steps.
In general, cleaning should begin in the areas requiring the most critical level of cleanliness and proceed toward areas of less critical requirements.
Non-Sterile Gowning Sequence
If gowning gloves are required put on by touching only the inside cuff of the glove. Pull glove cuffs down after donning both gloves.
Place head cover on head, completely covering bouffant hair cover, by handling only the inside of hood. Adjust snaps or ties for a snug fit and proper face/neck seal. Reusable head cover size labels are sewn to the inside of the item and head covers are generally received folded inside out. If safety glasses are worn and face masks are not, the glasses should be put on before hood snaps are adjusted for fit. In the most controlled clean rooms, a self-contained breathing helmet may be worn with a washable head cover worn between the helmet and the employee.
Place face masks on, if required. There are many types of masks or facial covers and selection should be appropriate for the level of contamination control needed.
Low top shoe covers can be put on now, if they were not previously placed over street shoes. Cleanroom garment can be donned now.
Zippered Frock
If donning a zippered frock, open zipper, if zipped, and carefully place arms in sleeves, one at a time, while not allowing any portion to touch the floor or bench. Pull frock on, taking care not to scrape outside of the frock against the back of the street clothes. Tuck head cover bib panels completely inside frock neck and close zipper. Fasten neck adjustment, if available, for a snug fit around neck. If frock has sleeve end adjustments, fasten snugly around both wrists. Do not roll up or cuff sleeves, as this creates a particulate trap and does not provide tight closure at wrist.
CEILINGS
Ceilings in which HEPA filters are located adjacent to each other:
Where HEPA filters are located adjacent to each other, only the grid should be cleaned, by dry vacuuming, to protect the filter. Strokes used in vacuuming should follow the grid pattern in one direction only.
Ceilings consisting of surfaces other than HEPA filters:
Ceilings consisting of surfaces other than HEPA filters should be vacuumed and wiped with a cleanroom wiper or mop wetted with a cleaning agent. Cleaning should be performed in a single-line fashion. Circular and scrubbing motions should be avoided.
WALLS
Walls should be cleaned beginning at the ceiling and working in vertical lines toward the floor.
First, the walls should be cleaned with a vacuum apparatus or a tacky mop, using overlapping strokes, followed by wiping or damp mopping. The wipers or mop should be wet with a cleaning agent.
Rinsing may be required, depending upon the cleaning agent selected.
DOORS, FRAMES, AND COMPONENTS
First, the top and side edges of the doors should be cleaned while they are ajar, using the appropriate vacuum tool or tacky mop, followed by wiping. The wiper should be moistened with a cleaning agent and the surface rinsed, if required by the cleaning agent. Doors and associated surfaces should be cleaned by following the procedure outlined for walls.
FLOORS
The entire floor should first be vacuumed or mopped with a tacky mop, using the following procedure:
The vacuum attachment or mop roller should be placed on the floor, pulled toward the operator, then lifted and moved, so that the next stroke starts adjacent to and slightly overlapping the first stroke.
The floor should then be damp-mopped with a cleaning agent, using a series of slightly overlapping strokes. Rinsing may be required, depending on the type of cleaning agent used.
MATS OR FLOOR COVERINGS WITH ADHESIVE SURFACES
Permanent mats and flooring with an adhesive surface should be cleaned in accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions.
The sheets of renewable mats that have removable sheets should be changed whenever necessary. The soiled sheet should be peeled from the four-corners and lifted in the form of a bag or pocket. The action should be performed slowly so that the accumulation of static charge and the spreading of already-deposited contamination is minimized
WORK STATIONS
Wiping should begin at the rear of the work surface with a folded cleanroom wiper moistened with a cleaning agent. The wiping motion should be in one direction only, from one side to the other, and a fresh area of the wiper should be used for each stroke. Each stroke should slightly overlap the previous stroke.
WASTE RECEPTACLES
If trash liners are acceptable, the liners should be removed from the waste receptacles by folding the top of the liner closed without evacuating the trapped air. The liners should be removed from the cleanroom immediately. A new liner should be placed inside the receptacle and the edges peeled open around the circumference. The liner should not be inflated.
If trash liners are not used, the receptacle should be removed from the cleanroom work area. The trash should be emptied and the waste receptacle cleaned with a cleaning agent before it is returned to the cleanroom area.
A cleanroom is a controlled environment where products are manufactured. It is a room in which the concentration of airborne particles is controlled to specified limits. Eliminating sub-micron airborne contamination is really a process of control. These contaminants are generated by people, process, facilities and equipment. They must be continually removed from the air. The level to which these particles need to be removed depends upon the standards required. The most frequently used standard is the Federal Standard 209E. The 209E is a document that establishes standard classes of air cleanliness for airborne particulate levels in cleanrooms and clean zones. Strict rules and procedures are followed to prevent contamination of the product.
The only way to control contamination is to control the total environment. Air flow rates and direction, pressurization, temperature, humidity and specialized filtration all need to be tightly controlled. And the sources of these particles need to controlled or eliminated whenever possible. There is more to a clean room than air filters. Cleanrooms are planned and manufactured using strict protocol and methods. They are frequently found in electronics, pharmaceutical, biopharmaceutical, medical device industries and other critical manufacturing environments.
It only takes a quick monitor of the air in a cleanroom compared to a typical office building to see the difference. Typical office building air contains from 500,000 to 1,000,000 particles (0.5 microns or larger) per cubic foot of air. A Class 100 cleanroom is designed to never allow more than 100 particles (0.5 microns or larger) per cubic foot of air. Class 1000 and Class 10,000 cleanrooms are designed to limit particles to 1000 and 10,000 respectively.
A human hair is about 75-100 microns in diameter. A particle 200 times smaller (0.5 micron) than the human hair can cause major disaster in a cleanroom. Contamination can lead to expensive downtime and increased production costs. In fact, the billion dollar NASA Hubble Space Telescope was damaged and did not perform as designed because of a particle smaller than 0.5 microns.
Once a cleanroom is built it must be maintained and cleaned to the same high standards. This handbook has been prepared to give professional cleaning staff information about how to clean the cleanroom.
What is Contamination?
Contamination is a process or act that causes materials or surfaces to be soiled with contaminating substances. There are two broad categories of surface contaminants: film type and particulates. These contaminants can produce a “killer defect” in a miniature circuit. Film contaminants of only 10 nm (nanometers) can drastically reduce coating adhesion on a wafer or chip. It is widely accepted that particles of 0.5 microns or larger are the target. However, some industries are now targeting smaller particles.
A partial list of contaminants is found below. Any of these can be the source for killing a circuit. Preventing these contaminants from entering the cleanroom environment is the objective. It requires a commitment by everyone entering the cleanroom to make it happen. Professional cleaning personnel need to be aware of the importance of controlling contaminants. Strict procedures should be followed whenever entering or cleaning a cleanroom. Compromise is not acceptable when cleaning in a cleanroom.
Sources of Contamination
This is a partial list of some of the commonly known contaminants that can cause problems in some cleanroom environments. It has been found that many of these contaminants are generated from five basic sources. The facilities, people, tools, fluids and the product being manufactured can all contribute to contamination. Review this list to gain a better understanding of where contamination originates.
Facilities
• Walls, floors and ceilings
• Paint and coatings
• Construction material (sheet rock, saw dust etc.)
• Air conditioning debris
• Room air and vapors
• Spills and leaks
People
• Skin flakes and oil
• Cosmetics and perfume
• Spittle
• Clothing debris (lint, fibers etc.)
• Hair
Tool Generated
• Friction and wear particles
• Lubricants and emissions
• Vibrations
• Brooms, mops and dusters
Fluids
• Particulates floating in air
• Bacteria, organics and moisture
• Floor finishes or coatings
• Cleaning chemicals
• Plasticizers (outgasses)
• Deionized water
Product generated
• Silicon chips
• Quartz flakes
• Cleanroom debris
• Aluminum particles
KEY ELEMENTS OF CONTAMINATION CONTROL
We will look at several areas of concern to get a better idea of the overall picture of contamination control. These are the things that need to be considered when providing an effective contaminations control program.
HEPA(High Efficiency Particulate Air Filter)- These filters are extremelyimportant for maintaining contamination control. They filter particles as smallas 0.3 microns with a 99.97% minimum particle-collective efficiency.
CLEANROOM ARCHITECTURE – Cleanrooms are designed to achieve and maintain a airflow in which essentially the entire body of air within a confined area moves with uniform velocity along parellel flow lines. This air flow is called laminar flow. The more restriction of air flow the more turbulence. Turbulence can cause particle movement.
FILTRATION – In addition to the HEPA filters commonly used in cleanrooms, there are a number of other filtration mechanisms used to remove particles from gases and liquids. These filters are essential for providing effective contamination control.
CLEANING – Cleaning is an essential element of contamination control. Decisions need to made about the details of cleanroom maintenance and cleaning. Applications and procedures need to be written and agreed upon by cleanroom management and contractors (if used). There are many problems associated with cleaning. Managers need to answer the following questions before proceeding with any cleanroom cleaning program:
• What is clean?
• How is clean measured?
• What cleaning materials can be used in the cleanroom?
• When can the cleanroom be cleaned?
• How frequent does it need to be cleaned?
CLEANROOM GARMENTS – The requirements for cleanroom garments will vary from location to location. It is important to know the local garment requirements of the cleanroom management. Gloves, face masks and head covers are standard in nearly every cleanroom environment. Smocks are being used more and more. Jump suits are required in very clean environments.
HUMANS IN CLEANROOMS – There are both physical and psychological concerns when humans are present in cleanrooms. Physical behavior like fast motion and horseplay can increase contamination. Psychological concerns like room temperature, humidity, claustrophobia, odors and workplace attitude are important. Below are several ways people produce contamination:
• Body Regenerative Processes– Skin flakes, oils, perspiration and hair.
• Behavior– Rate of movement, sneezing and coughing.
• Attitude– Work habits and communciation between workers.
People are a major source of contamination in the cleanroom. Look at the people activies listed below. Notice the number of particles produced per minute during these activities.
PEOPLE ACTIVITY PARTICLES/MINUTE (0.3 microns and larger)
Motionless (Standing or Seated) 100,000
Walking about 2 mph 5,000,000
Walking about 3.5 mph 7,000,000
Walking about 5 mph 10,000,000
Horseplay 100,000,000
COMMODITIES – Care is taken when selecting and using commodity items in cleanrooms. Wipers, cleanroom paper and pencils and other supplies that service the cleanroom should be carefully screened and selected. Review of the local cleanroom requirements for approving and taking these items into the cleanroom are essential. In fact, many cleanroom managers will have approval lists of these types of items.
COSMETICS – Many cosmetics contain sodium, magnesium, silicon, calcium, potassium or iron. These chemicals can create damaging particles. Cleanroom managers may ban or restrict cosmetics in the cleanroom. This is usually dependent upon the threat to the product being made in the cleanroom. A recent mirror on a space telescope was fogged up from the cologne that was present in the cleanroom.
MEASUREMENT AND INSTRUMENTATION – Some important measurements related to contamination control are particle count, air flow & velocity, humidity, temperature and surface cleanliness. Cleanroom managers usually have specific standards and/or instruments to measure these factors.
ELECTROSTATIC DISCHARGE (ESD) – When two surfaces rub together an electrical charge can be created. Moving air creates a charge. People touching surfaces or walking across the floor can create a triboelectric charge. Special care is taken to use ESD protective materials to prevent damage from ESD. Cleaning managers should work with their personnel to understand where these conditions may be present and how to prevent them.
Cleaning Procedures for Clean Rooms
What follows are some recommended procedures for cleaning cleanrooms. It is important to emphasize that these procedures are guidelines and not standards or rules. The procedures listed here are routine cleaning tasks. Local cleanroom cleaning procedures may supercede the ones listed here. It is important for cleaning managers to review all cleaning procedures to be used in a cleanroom with the cleanroom management. A detailed cleaning schedule should be prepared for every cleanroom. Here are some procedures to be completed when cleaning a Class 10,000 cleanroom:
Cleaning Procedures for a Class 10,000 Cleanroom
Housekeeping maintenance of the cleanroom and restricted areas is essential to assure quality. Cleaning of a cleanroom should be performed on a daily basis. Improper cleaning of the cleanroom can lead to contamination and a loss in end user product quality. Proper selection of equipment and materials is important for proper cleaning. Only products that have proven cleanroom performance records should be considered for use in cleanrooms. These products should be listed and all vendors should be informed about the strict policies of how products are qualified. All procedures should be strictly enforced. Below are some examples of how to organize the cleaning to be done in a cleanroom. These are NOT schedules or exact procedures. They are guidelines for preparing work procedures and schedules. Local requirements must be included in any cleaning program.
List of Some of Equipment and Supplies Needed to Clean the Cleanroom
(All supplies must meet the Class 10,000 minimum requirements)
• Cleaning and disinfecting solutions
• Cleanroom mops
• Cleanroom vacuum cleaner (if allowed)
• Cleanroom wipers
• Cleanroom mop bucket and wringer
List of Cleaning Tasks to be Completed in the Cleanroom
(Frequency may vary depending upon local requirements)
• Cleaning of all work surfaces in the controlled environment.
• Vacuuming (if allowed) of the floors and work surfaces.
• Emptying of appropriate trash and waste.
• Cleaning of the doors, door frames and lockers in the pre-staging area and gowning areas using the approved cleaning solution.
• Mop gowning and cleanroom floors.
A cleanroom is a controlled environment where products are manufactured. It is a room in which the concentration of airborne particles is controlled to specified limits. Eliminating sub-micron airborne contamination is really a process of control. These contaminants are generated by people, process, facilities and equipment. They must be continually removed from the air. The level to which these particles need to be removed depends upon the standards required. The most frequently used standard is the Federal Standard 209E. The 209E is a document that establishes standard classes of air cleanliness for airborne particulate levels in cleanrooms and clean zones.
Strict rules and procedures are followed to prevent contamination of the product.
The only way to control contamination is to control the total environment. Air flow rates and direction, pressurization, temperature, humidity and specialized filtration all need to be tightly controlled. And the sources of these particles need to controlled or eliminated whenever possible. There is more to a clean room than air filters. Cleanrooms are planned and manufactured using strict protocol and methods. They are frequently found in electronics, pharmaceutical, biopharmaceutical, medical device industries and other critical manufacturing environments.
It only takes a quick monitor of the air in a cleanroom compared to a typical office building to see the difference. Typical office building air contains from 500,000 to 1,000,000 particles (0.5 microns or larger) per cubic foot of air. A Class 100 cleanroom is designed to never allow more than 100 particles (0.5 microns or larger) per cubic foot of air. Class 1000 and Class 10,000 cleanrooms are designed to limit particles to 1000 and 10,000 respectively.
A human hair is about 75-100 microns in diameter. A particle 200 times smaller (0.5 micron) than the human hair can cause major disaster in a cleanroom. Contamination can lead to expensive downtime and increased production costs. In fact, the billion dollar NASA Hubble Space Telescope was damaged and did not perform as designed because of a particle smaller than 0.5 microns.
Once a cleanroom is built it must be maintained and cleaned to the same high standards. This handbook has been prepared to give professional cleaning staff information about how to clean the cleanroom.
What is Contamination?
Contamination is a process or act that causes materials or surfaces to be soiled with contaminating substances. There are two broad categories of surface contaminants: film type and particulates. These contaminants can produce a “killer defect” in a miniature circuit. Film contaminants of only 10 nm (nanometers) can drastically reduce coating adhesion on a wafer or chip. It is widely accepted that particles of 0.5 microns or larger are the target. However, some industries are now targeting smaller particles.
A partial list of contaminants is found below. Any of these can be the source for killing a circuit. Preventing these contaminants from entering the cleanroom environment is the objective. It requires a commitment by everyone entering the cleanroom to make it happen. Professional cleaning personnel need to be aware of the importance of controlling contaminants. Strict procedures should be followed whenever entering or cleaning a cleanroom. Compromise is not acceptable when cleaning in a cleanroom.
Sources of Contamination
Here is a partial list of some of the commonly known contaminants that can cause problems in some cleanroom environments. It has been found that many of these contaminants are generated from five basic sources. The facilities, people, tools, fluids and the product being manufactured can all contribute to contamination. Review this list to gain a better understanding of where contamination originates.
1. Facilities
• Walls, floors and ceilings
• Paint and coatings
• Construction material (sheet rock, saw dust etc.) Air conditioning debris
• Room air and vapors
• Spills and leaks
2. People
• Skin flakes and oil
• Cosmetics and perfume
• Spittle
• Clothing debris (lint, fibers etc.)
• Hair
3. Tool Generated
• Friction and wear particles
• Lubricants and emissions
• Vibrations
• Brooms, mops and dusters
4. Fluids
• Particulates floating in air
• Bacteria, organics and moisture
• Floor finishes or coatings
• Cleaning chemicals
• Plasticizers (outgasses)
• Deionized water
5. Product generated
• Silicon chips
• Quartz flakes
• Cleanroom debris
• Aluminum particles
Key Elements of Contamination Control
We will look at several areas of concern to get a better idea of the overall picture of contamination control. These are the things that need to be considered when providing an effective contamination control program.
HEPA(High Efficiency Particulate Air Filter)- These filters are extremelyimportant for maintaining contamination control. They filter particles as smallas 0.3 microns with a 99.97% minimum particle-collective efficiency.
CLEANROOM ARCHITECTURE – Cleanrooms are designed to achieve and maintain a airflow in which essentially the entire body of air within a confined area moves with uniform velocity along parellel flow lines. This air flow is called laminar flow. The more restriction of air flow the more turbulence. Turbulence can cause particle movement.
FILTRATION – In addition to the HEPA filters commonly used in cleanrooms, there are a number of other filtration mechanisms used to remove particles from gases and liquids. These filters are essential for providing effective contamination control.
CLEANING – Cleaning is an essential element of contamination control. Decisions need to made about the details of cleanroom maintenance and cleaning. Applications and procedures need to be written and agreed upon by cleanroom management and contractors (if used). There are many problems associated with cleaning. Managers need to answer the following questions before proceeding with any cleanroom cleaning program:
• What is clean?
• How is clean measured?What cleaning materials can be used in the cleanroom?
• When can the cleanroom be cleaned?
• How frequent does it need to be cleaned?
CLEANROOM GARMENTS – The requirements for cleanroom garments will vary from location to location. It is important to know the local garment requirements of the cleanroom management. Gloves, face masks and head covers are standard in nearly every cleanroom environment. Smocks are being used more and more. Jump suits are required in very clean environments.
HUMANS IN CLEANROOMS – There are both physical and psychological concerns when humans are present in cleanrooms. Physical behavior like fast motion and horseplay can increase contamination. Psychological concerns like room temperature, humidity, claustrophobia, odors and workplace attitude are important. Below are several ways people produce contamination:
• Body Regenerative Processes– Skin flakes, oils, perspiration and hair.
• Behavior– Rate of movement, sneezing and coughing.
• Attitude– Work habits and communciation between workers.
People are a major source of contamination in the cleanroom. Look at the people activies listed below. Notice the number of particles produced per minute during these activities.
PEOPLE ACTIVITY PARTICLES/MINUTE (0.3 microns and larger)
Motionless (Standing or Seated) 100,000
Walking about 2 mph 5,000,000
Walking about 3.5 mph 7,000,000
Walking about 5 mph 10,000,000
Horseplay 100,000,000
COMMODITIES – Care is taken when selecting and using commodity items in cleanrooms. Wipers, cleanroom paper and pencils and other supplies that service the cleanroom should be carefully screened and selected. Review of the local cleanroom requirements for approving and taking these items into the cleanroom are essential. In fact, many cleanroom managers will have approval lists of these types of items.
COSMETICS – Many cosmetics contain sodium, magnesium, silicon, calcium, potassium or iron. These chemicals can create damaging particles. Cleanroom managers may ban or restrict cosmetics in the cleanroom. This is usually dependent upon the threat to the product being made in the cleanroom. A recent mirror on a space telescope was fogged up from the cologne that was present in the cleanroom.
MEASUREMENT AND INSTRUMENTATION – Some important measurements related to contamination control are particle count, air flow & velocity, humidity, temperature and surface cleanliness. Cleanroom managers usually have specific standards and/or instruments to measure these factors.
ELECTROSTATIC DISCHARGE (ESD) – When two surfaces rub together an electrical charge can be created. Moving air creates a charge. People touching surfaces or walking across the floor can create a triboelectric charge. Special care is taken to use ESD protective materials to prevent damage from ESD. Cleaning managers should work with their personnel to understand where these conditions may be present and how to prevent them.
Cleaning Procedures for Clean Rooms
What follows are some recommended procedures for cleaning cleanrooms. It is important to emphasize that these procedures are guidelines and not standards or rules. The procedures listed here are routine cleaning tasks. Local cleanroom cleaning procedures may supercede the ones listed here. It is important for cleaning managers to review all cleaning procedures to be used in a cleanroom with the cleanroom management. A detailed cleaning schedule should be prepared for every cleanroom. Here are some procedures to be completed when cleaning a Class 10,000 cleanroom:
Cleaning Procedures for a Class 10,000 Cleanroom
Housekeeping maintenance of the cleanroom and restricted areas is essential to assure quality. Cleaning of a cleanroom should be performed on a daily basis. Improper cleaning of the cleanroom can lead to contamination and a loss in end user product quality. Proper selection of equipment and materials is important for proper cleaning. Only products that have proven cleanroom performance records should be considered for use in cleanrooms. These products should be listed and all vendors should be informed about the strict policies of how products are qualified. All procedures should be strictly enforced. Below are some examples of how to organize the cleaning to be done in a cleanroom. These are NOT schedules or exact procedures. They are guidelines for preparing work procedures and schedules. Local requirements must be included in any cleaning program.
List of Some of Equipment and Supplies Needed to Clean the Cleanroom
(All supplies must meet the Class 10,000 minimum requirements)
• Cleaning and disinfecting solutions
• Cleanroom mops
• Cleanroom vacuum cleaner (if allowed)
• Cleanroom wipers
• Cleanroom mop bucket and wringer
List of Cleaning Tasks to be Completed in the Cleanroom
(Frequency may vary depending upon local requirements)
• Cleaning of all work surfaces in the controlled environment.
• Vacuuming (if allowed) of the floors and work surfaces.
• Emptying of appropriate trash and waste.
• Cleaning of the doors, door frames and lockers in the pre-staging area and gowning areas using the approved cleaning solution.
• Mop gowning and cleanroom floors.
• Cleaning Procedures for a Class 1000 Cleanroom
• Below is a sample of a cleaning program in a Class 1000 Cleanroom. This is only a sample of a program. Local standards and requirements must be followed.
Area Description of Work Frequency
101 Change tacky mats Every 2 hours
102 Wet mop with approved mop, cleaner & DI water 2 times per shift
103 Dust mop (if allowed) 2 times per shift
104 Remove trash, sweep, mop with appropriate cleaner wipe down tables and coffee area, clean walls and recycle cans 1 time per shift
105 Vacuum entry mats, sweep and mop floors 1 time per shift
106 Mop floor with pre-burnish cleaner and tap water 1 time per shift
107 Remove trash. Always wear gloves. Never take waste containers inside cleanrooms. 1 time per shift
108 Wet mop floors 1 time per shift
109 Remove acid and solvent trash 1 time per shift
110 Clean and replenish dispenser in all restrooms 3 times per week
111 Vacuum floor (if allowed) 2 times per week
112 Clean stainless steel pass throughs with s/s cleaner and appropriate wipes 1 time per week
The list above is a sample of some of the common tasks that need to be performed in a Class 1000 cleanroom. The list is not exhaustive. But gives some ideas of how to prepare work schedules and procedures. An assessment of the cleanroom in conjunction with cleanroom management will help define these tasks and frequencies.
Cleaning Procedures for a Class 1000 Cleanroom
Below is a sample of a cleaning program in a Class 1000 Cleanroom. This is only a sample of a program. Local standards and requirements must be followed.
Area Description of Work Frequency
101 Change tacky mats Every 2 hours
102 Wet mop with approved mop, cleaner & DI water 2 times per shift
103 Dust mop (if allowed) 2 times per shift
104 Remove trash, sweep, mop with appropriate cleaner wipe down tables and coffee area, clean walls and recycle cans 1 time per shift
105 Vacuum entry mats, sweep and mop floors 1 time per shift
106 Mop floor with pre-burnish cleaner and tap water 1 time per shift
107 Remove trash. Always wear gloves. Never take waste containers inside cleanrooms. 1 time per shift
108 Wet mop floors 1 time per shift
109 Remove acid and solvent trash 1 time per shift
110 Clean and replenish dispenser in all restrooms 3 times per week
111 Vacuum floor (if allowed) 2 times per week
112 Clean stainless steel pass throughs with s/s cleaner and appropriate wipes 1 time per week
The list above is a sample of some of the common tasks that need to be performed in a Class 1000 cleanroom. The list is not exhaustive. But gives some ideas of how to prepare work schedules and procedures. An assessment of the cleanroom in conjunction with cleanroom management will help define these tasks and frequencies.
It will be interesting to see just how sustainable cleanrooms will become in the next few years.
What has your organization been able to do or perhaps currently reviewing for your cleanroom? Share your thoughts, ideas, and success!
Source: “A Basic Introduction to Cleanrooms” – by Roger McFadden

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Cleaning Tips and information for cleanrooms, data centers, office buildings, just about any business.
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2 Responses to What is a Cleanroom

  1. Dexter says:

    “A number of companies are turning to modular cleanrooms as a way to minimize costs and gain efficiencies as opposed to contracting for custom-built units.” Modular cleanrooms also allow for significant tax advantages.

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